Pink Floyd - The Dark Side of the Moon

Pink Floyd’s best album also happens to be their most accessible conceptually, a record that lacks the angry, political bent of The Wall, the wistful Syd Barrett recollections on Wish You Were Here, or the unfocused psychedelia of their earlier material. Instead, Dark Side of the Moon is about the mundane: breathing, wasting time, making money, and death. There are no protagonists, antagonists, or grand narratives; the album’s so universally loved because it is, in fact, so universal. It’s a blank canvas for anyone with a pulse.

On a smaller scale, though, it’s filled with brilliant sonic and stylistic decisions that stand the test of time. There’s Wright’s gorgeous piano tinkling on “Us and Them”, the burbling, stutter-stepping synths on “Any Colour You Like”, the pummeling transition from 7/4 to 4/4 time on “Money”, the gospel-tinged backing vocals on “Brain Damage”, and, of course, the little bits of spoken word dialogue that play throughout the record.

Dark Side of the Moon, though, peaks at its very end with “Eclipse”, where the record’s themes of minutiae comes full circle. “All that is now/ All that is gone/ All that’s to come/ Everything under the sun is in tune/ But the sun is eclipsed by the moon,” sings Waters. In essence, our everyday lives, though important to us, amount to nothing on a wider, grander scale. At the same time, what exactly does exist on that “wider, grander scale” is unbeknownst to us. So we stay concerned with the small things: breathing, wasting time, making money, and eventually, our own deaths.

“There is no dark side of the moon, really. Matter of fact it’s all dark,” says an extraneous voice at one point. Who knew Floyd’s most poignant statement could also be so stark and beautifully obvious?

Track Listing

1. Speak to Me

2. Breathe

3. On The Run

4. Time/Breathe Reprise

5. The Great Gig in the Sky

6. Money

7. Us and Them

8. Any Colour You Like

9. Brain Damage

10. Eclipse


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